Living without Google Maps, Gmail and YouTube? Millions of Android mobiles will not be able to use them

1631162330 601485 1631162574 rrss normal.jpg
1631162330 601485 1631162574 rrss normal.jpg

It is the great problem of having devices connected to the internet, that there comes a time when the technology compatible with them is not compatible with the services we use daily and, therefore, there is a moment in which they stop allowing us the access. Which makes them, virtually, pretty ornaments to put on the table performing photo frame work (or worse). But life is like that, and for that reason, Google has made the decision to remove from the list of terminals compatible with some of its apps a good number of them that, it must be said, were already surpassed many years ago. Even that of the user who clung to his first smartphone and did not want to let go of it until it fell to pieces from his hands. Live without those apps? That is the (figurative) challenge to which those of Mountain View force us, who have decided that both Google Maps, Gmail and YouTube, stop working with all devices that have Android 2.3 installed, or any lower version. This, to give you an idea, affects mobile phones (there were not many tablets yet) that reached stores around the end of 2010. That is, more than a decade ago. This decision is final and will take effect this month, specifically on the 27th, at which time it will no longer be possible to use them or access the information we generate through them. The decision comes, in Google’s words, “as part of our current efforts to keep our users safe.” This has to do with privacy policies and the obvious impossibility of guaranteeing the integrity of these devices when their operating system has been without updates (critical and non-critical) for a long time. As we told you before, this puts us in the situation that, for the first time in history, those devices that we keep once they have completed their useful life, cease to have real functionality over the years, so they do not it is possible to use them again. Unlike other types of devices that do maintain their usefulness, above all, due to their condition of disconnected devices: there we have the example of MP3 players, Apple iPods, old Palm or Casio PDAs, etc. But as someone might think, it is the law of life. Or maybe planned obsolescence?